Somalia’s politician alerts UN on Taiwan & Turkey’s Nuclear Weapons

Uranium extracted in Somaliland being used to manufacture nuclear weapons for Taiwan and Turkey. People of Somaliland are Urgently calling international independent investigation by the International Atomic energy agency in this matter.

Sultan Saciid Diiriye , a widely respected politician and Chairman of Somaliland peoples party writes to United Nations to draw International body’s attention in a bid to save the world for Taiwan and Turkey’s nuclear weapons.

Somaliland opened a defacto embassy in Taiwan last September to publicise potential oil, gas and tourism , Mining resources available for investment, a relationship that has angered both China and Somalia. Somaliland signed the agreement on establishing offices in Taiwan in February of last year but did not disclose it until July.

Islamabad Telegraph Report

Islamabad: Noted politician from Somaliland has recently written a letter to United Nations drawing attention of world’s International body to stop Taiwan and Turkey to extract Uranium from Samaliland.

The letter ( a copy is available with this Newspaper) aims to draw attention of United Nations to the potential issue of uranium extracted in Somaliland being used to manufacture nuclear weapons for Taiwan and Turkey.

“The United Nations and the International Atomic Energy must prevent the Government of Taiwan from taking our natural mineral resources including uranium from Somaliland and Somalia. The current Somaliland and Somalian administrations are highly corrupt regimes which provide no transparency or accountability. We request international assistance to keep our natural resource of uranium in our country for reasons of environmental impact and health and safety, as well as issues of global security. The Taiwanese Government must understand that neither Somaliland nor Taiwan is a recognised country, therefore any uranium extraction originating from Somaliland would be illegal,” Sultan Saciid Diiriy, Chairman of Somaliland peoples party said in the letter.

According the letter, Somaliland opened a defacto embassy in Taiwan last September to publicise potential oil, gas and tourism , Mining resources available for investment, a relationship that has angered both China and Somalia. Somaliland signed the agreement on establishing offices in Taiwan in February of last year but did not disclose it until July. The country borders Djibouti, where China has its first ever overseas military base.

“Both China and Somalia have expressed their disapproval of the new-found ties between Taiwan and Somaliland. But Mohamed Omar Haji Mohamoud, Somaliland’s chief representative in Taiwan, stated at the opening of the office in Taipei that his country is an independent state forging ties based on the common values of freedom and democracy. He referred to the huge potential for foreign investment in the mining sector in Somaliland, which includes hydrocarbon deposits, oil, gas and coal.& Uranium mining,” the letter stated.

Taiwan has formal diplomatic ties with only 15 countries because of pressure from China which lays claim to the island. Mohamoud, denying that loans or financial offers from Taiwan were part of the deal to open the offices, dismissed criticism from China. He said that no country has the right to dictate to Somaliland what the country’s aims should be and with whom they should form relations. Just because Somaliland wishes to have good relations with Taiwan doesn’t mean that China can dictate to us, he said.

Although Taiwan’s membership of the nuclear weapons club would be a blow to the spirit of the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), the International Atomic Energy Agency must do everything to stop uranium enrichment to weapons grade.

With regard to Taiwan’s plans to dispose of nuclear waste, we believe that the highly corrupt regime in Somaliland has reached a deal with the Taiwanese government to bury nuclear waste both onshore and offshore in our country. In 2017, Taipower Power Co., the state-run utility, declined to confirm a media report stating it had selected four sites for the disposal of nuclear waste, saying that its two reports submitted to the Atomic Energy Council (AEC) did not mention the issue of sites.

Meanwhile, Turkish President Erdogan said in July last year that while it was unacceptable for Turkey to be forbidden by nuclear-armed states from obtaining its own nuclear weapons, he did not say whether he had plans to acquire them. Turkey signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty in 1980 and the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty in 1996, which bans all nuclear detonations for any purpose. Erdogan hinted that he wanted the same protection for Turkey as Israel, which occupies a commanding position among its non-nuclear-armed neighbours.

By September, weeks before his order to launch the military across the border to ‘clear’ Kurdish areas was issued, Erdogan told a meeting of his governing party that he could not accept the West’s insistence that he cannot have nuclear weapons. As Turkey is now in open confrontation with its NATO allies, having gambled on and won a bet that he could conduct a military incursion into Syria and get away with it, Erdogan’s threat takes on a new meaning.

In developing its nuclear programme, Turkey has found a willing partner in President Putin of Russia, who in 2018 travelled to Turkey to signal the official start of construction of a US$20bn nuclear plant on the country’s Mediterranean coast. Some of Russia’s motivation is political; just as Mr Putin’s export of an S-400 air defence system to Ankara, against American objections, the construction of the plant places a NATO member partly in Russia’s camp, dependent on it for technology.

Both the governments of Taiwan and Turkey may wish to extract uranium in Somalia and Somaliland, and to this end are engaging in talks about mining projects. They should not do this at the expense of our people. The international community must take action to enforce nuclear disarmament and stop the manufacture of weapons of mass destruction, which should not be encouraged in our poorly run countries. Neither should Taiwan and Turkey take advantage of the current corrupt regimes that govern Somalia and Somaliland.

” The international community must cease financing and aiding the regimes in Somaliland and Somalia. In particular, Britain and other European countries are wasting billions of dollars on these highly corrupt regimes and this must be stopped,” Sultan said in the letter.

“In Somalia and Somaliland there is no public sector and consequently, no healthcare, transportation or roads. There is nothing that these government regimes provide to their people as everything has been privatised or outsourced. Why are the UK and European countries wasting money on these regimes,” Sultan questioned.

“This must be stopped,” He concluded.

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